Tag Archives: Traumatic brain injury

How to Win Your Personal Injury Litigation

plaintiff-101-cover-audioWhen going through a personal injury litigation, it is hard to know who is to trust. But once you have your lawyer on retainer, it is extremely beneficial to be completely open with your attorney. Below is Takeaway #8 from the Amazon Best Seller, “Plaintiff 101″—

Takeaway #8

Do not keep any secrets from your lawyer. If something in your past may hurt your case, tell your lawyer first. In all probability, it’s not as bad as you think. Remember the lessons of history. It wasn’t the break-in that led to Richard Nixon’s downfall. It was the cover-up.

A lawsuit is a team effort between you and your law firm. To achieve a successful result, you must meet your responsibilities with your best efforts. Be open, honest and flexible throughout your case.


For those who are interested in owning Amazon’s Best Seller, “Plaintiff 101” as a valuable resource:

Click here to >>ORDER<< your copy TODAY!

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How to Spot the Emotional Stages of Recovery from a TBI

We all have different family situations, different jobs, different strengths, and different weaknesses. Despite all these differences, there are a number of very common emotional stages that people with a head injury go through. This is based upon my own experience treating patients, but many investigators note similar findings. Here are a view stages to spot when a loved one is recovering/suffering from a TBI.

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Confusion and Agitation

This can last minutes or it can last for months. In the hospital setting, this is very difficult for family members. Someone who is very meek and mild, for example, can be physically aggressive. They may punch the nurses, or swear and curse at family members. It’s very frightening for family members, and it feels like it is going to last forever. It may take a while, but people eventually come out of it.

Denial

The patient says, “There’s nothing wrong with me.” For example, they’re in a motor vehicle accident, they’re briefly seen in an emergency room, and they go home. Suddenly, they’re having difficulties. They’re forgetting things or burning food. Family members may say, “you seem different.” But the head-injured person says “No, there’s nothing wrong with me.

Anger and Depression

Denial is a very common problem, but eventually it breaks down. Head injury problems just don’t go away. The same problems happen over and over and over again. This leads to the next phase, in which the person has a limited awareness of the head injury, beginning what I call the depression/anger phase. When you realize you are different and can’t do things like you used to, you may become angry or depressed.

 

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How to Help Veterans with TBI

The holidays are coming and we have the ones we love on our minds more than ever. Veterans who have experienced TBI, including some who didn’t know they had a traumatic brain injury until later, talk about their experiences.

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Listen as they describe the signs and symptoms of TBI and its effects on their families. By reaching out for help, they were able to overcome these obstacles and live better lives. Check out this video that Make the Connection created –

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What Your Friends & Family Need to Know About Your TBI

Do you have a friend or a family member that has just been in an accident and is now suffering from a traumatic brain injury? Here are some key points about traumatic brain injury —

  • The effect of a TBI can vary depending on the severity of the injury and where it occurs
  • Around 1 in 3 injury-related deaths involve a TBI
  • Roughly 2% of Americans live with a TBI-related disability
  • The majority of TBIs are caused by falls
  • TBI symptoms may include confusion, persistent headaches and sleeping problems
  • If someone receives a head injury and experiences convulsions or slurred speech, they should seek urgent medical attention
  • A concussion is classed as a mild TBI
  • In America, TBI is the third most common injury to result from child abuse
  • Blood pressure can severely drop after a head injury.

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Mertes suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the accident. But she is more than a survivor. She has turned tragedy into triumph, helping others who have had their world shattered pick up the pieces.

Through Fulfill Your Destiny, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation, Lt. Col. Mertes financially aids people in the Tampa Bay community whose careers have been altered by injury or unforeseen circumstances. Special consideration is given to those who have sustained a traumatic brain injury.

“Imagine if you could no longer do what you are trained and experienced to do today.  What if everything you have worked for educationally and professionally was gone in an instant? This is my story. Following my injury and treatment, it became apparent I could no longer perform the work required of a military officer with a Top Secret clearance.”


plaintiff-101-cover-audioGrab your copy of her Amazon Best Seller, Plaintiff 101, here!

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Over A Decade Has Passed Since Her Nearly Fatal Accident – A Look Into Karen Mertes’ Triumph Over Her TBI

Retired Air Force Lt. Col. Karen Mertes knows what it’s like to have your life suddenly altered. On Feb. 7, 2007, her life’s path was forever changed. Stationed at MacDill Air Force Base at the time, she was struck by a drunk driver who was traveling over 100 miles per hour on I-75. He had a blood alcohol level of .221, nearly three times the legal limit. During the crash, “I made a futile attempt to regain control of my vehicle as my car slid sideways down the interstate, with cars in the remaining lanes veering around my car to avoid hitting me. As my life hung in the balance, I made a bargain with God. I promised God that if I were blessed to live, I’d spend the rest of my life helping others. This promise was the genesis of my nonprofit Fulfill Your Destiny.”

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Mertes suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the accident. But she is more than a survivor. She has turned tragedy into triumph, helping others who have had their world shattered pick up the pieces.

Through Fulfill Your Destiny, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation, Lt. Col. Mertes financially aids people in the Tampa Bay community whose careers have been altered by injury or unforeseen circumstances. Special consideration is given to those who have sustained a traumatic brain injury.

“Imagine if you could no longer do what you are trained and experienced to do today.  What if everything you have worked for educationally and professionally was gone in an instant? This is my story. Following my injury and treatment, it became apparent I could no longer perform the work required of a military officer with a Top Secret clearance.”


plaintiff-101-cover-audioGrab your copy of her Amazon Best Seller, Plaintiff 101, here!

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Preparing Your College Students for the Dangers of Drinking and Driving

We are less than a month away from the beginning of the fall semester for college students. As a parent you might be roaming Target for the perfect dorm room decorations for your soon-to-be or current college student, working out a budget for an allowance, and checking with your insurance company about your child’s car while they’re out of state. Wherever you’re at in the checklist – make sure that talking to your child about the dangers of drunk driving has been checked off. College students are guaranteed to host parties on and off campus – and where there is alcohol – bad choices are never far behind.

In “A Snapshot of Annual High-Risk College Drinking Consequences” by College Drinking Prevention — 1,825 college students between the ages of 18-24 die from alcohol-related unintentional injuries, including motor vehicle accidents.

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Karen Mertes has been a victim of a car accident at the hands of a drunk driver and endured a traumatic brain injury. She wants to raise awareness and offer advice to those fighting the battles she has in the past.


For those who are interested in owning Amazon’s Best Seller, “Plaintiff 101” as a valuable resource:

Click here to >>ORDER<< your copy TODAY!

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Above quote excerpted from Plaintiff 101: The Black Book of Inside Information Your Lawyer Will Want You To Know.

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Is My Career Over Because of my TBI?

After suffering an injury from a car accident, however mild or severe it may be, you must learn how to live life with your injury. It is important to remember that no matter how frustrated you become, some of these effects will only be temporary. Although, you may need to learn a ‘new normal.’

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Initially, you may experience a period of denial where you’re unable to realistically assess what could be your reduced performance levels. Given my injury, I was no longer able to achieve my pre-injury performance where I had consistently exceeded expectations.

Unfortunately, depending on the severity of how your injury may impact your work performance, it could pose a threat to your case. The defense will use whatever new challenges you face at work as a litigation advantage.

You may be placed in a “no-win” situation. If you cannot return to work, his [the defense attorney] bargaining position has improved due to your lack of limited resources to live on. Also, his experts will likely opine you are a malingerer. If you do return to work, even under duress and in pain, he will argue you did not suffer economic damages as you continued to be “employable” post-injury.”


For those who are interested in owning Amazon’s Best Seller, “Plaintiff 101” as a valuable resource:

Click here to >>ORDER<< your copy TODAY!

Above quote excerpted from Plaintiff 101: The Black Book of Inside Information Your Lawyer Will Want You To Know.

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